Declaration of Antarctic Place of Citizenship


If you were born in Antarctica, which country would you be a citizen of?

Emilio Marcos Palma, born on 7 January 1978, is the first person known to be born on the actual continent of Antarctica.

Up to 2009, eleven children are known to have actually been born in Antarctica (ie south of the 60th parallel south). Eight were born at the Argentine Esperanza Base:
  1. Emilio Marcos Palma (07.01.1978);
  2. Marisa de las Nieves Delgado (27.05.1978);
  3. Rubén Eduardo de Carli (21.09.1979);
  4. Francisco Javier Sosa (21.09.1979);
  5. Silvia Analía Arnouil (14.01.1980);
  6. José Manuel Valladares Solís (24.01.1980);
  7. Lucas Daniel Posse (04.02.1980);
  8. María Sol Cosenza (03.05.1983).
Three were born at the Chilean Base Presidente Eduardo Frei Montalva:
  1. Juan Pablo Camacho Martínez (21.11.1984);
  2. Gisella Ester Cortés Rojas (02.12.1984);
  3. Ignacio Alfonso Miranda Lagunas (23.01.1985). [1,2,3]
Emilio Marcos Palma was born in Fortín Sargento Cabral at the Esperanza Base near the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. Emilio was automatically granted Argentine citizenship by the government since his parents were both Argentine citizens.

Emilio was also born in the claimed Argentine Antarctica (Antártida Argentina). This is a sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina as part of its national territory. However, this claim is not internationally recognised, and overlaps with British and Chilean claims in Antarctica. Since Emilio was also born in British Antarctic Territory, he had the right to claim British Overseas Territory citizenship under the terms of British Antarctic nationality law. British Overseas Territories citizens are also Commonwealth citizens, by the way. However, neither he nor his parents filed a request.

So Emilio Marcos Palma is, and remains, an Argentine citizen, by virtue of the Roman legal concept of jus sanguinis (Latin for 'right of blood'). The Roman legal concept of jus soli (Latin for 'right of soil') does not apply to Antarctica. If you were born in Antarctica, you would become a citizen of the country (or countries) your parents are registered in (or claimed by).

The United Nations considers a child born in-flight to have been born in the airplane's registered country. Some countries point to the city where the child first disembarked the plane as the place of birth, and to the airplane's registered country as the place of citizenship. [4]

If you were born in a micronation, or to micronationalists, ie to people who claim citizenship or membership in a micronation by virtue of the Cesidian law concept of jus cerebri humani, the rule that applies to births in Antarctica — not to births on a airplane — would apply. The child would become a citizen of the country (or countries) the parents are registered in (or claimed by). The Roman legal concepts of jus soli or jus sanguinis do not apply to micronations or to micronationalists.

So being born in a micronation, and/or to one or more micronationalist parents, is like being physically born in Antarctica — or like being born on a plane unregistered in any country, or registered in Antarctica.

With very few exceptions, the great majority of people on Earth cannot claim Antarctica as their true place of birth. However, if there is anyone on Earth that can claim Antarctica as their true place of citizenship, it is the micronationalist, or the national of unrepresented or underrepresented polities. Anybody else can only claim a place of citizenship outside of Antarctica.

What does all of this mean?

It means this: I was born in Jamaica Hospital, New York City, so New York State is my place of birth (jus soli).

Since New York State is my place of birth, the United States claims I'm one of its citizens, and this means that my place of birth is, for all practical purposes, in the Americas.

Since my mother was an Italian citizen when I was born; I was older than 18 when she became a naturalised US citizen; and I have never renounced my Italian citizenship; this means that my place of citizenship (jus sanguinis) can also be Italy, if I make and prove the claim is legitimate.

Since Italy is my place of citizenship, the European Union can claim I'm one of its citizens, if I make and prove the claim is legitimate, and this means that my place of citizenship by right of blood (jus sanguinis) is, for all practical purposes, in Europe.

Since
  1. I have claimed to be a micronationalist since at least 17 November 1998, when I started The Tallini Family (TTF);
  2. I have worked for a micronational company since at least 30 September 2005, when I founded the Cesidian Root;
  3. I have served as the Governor of a micronation since at least 19 January 2008, when I founded the United Micronations Multi-Oceanic Archipelago (UMMOA);
  4. My micronation has been recognised by at least two intergovernmental organisations (IGOs), incorporated on two continents, since at least 14 September 2011, when the UMMOA as a state — already accredited with, and incorporated in, the International [States] Parliament for Safety and Peace — became an Associate Member of the Organization of Emerging African States (OEAS), and as an international organisation it became a Consultative Agency to the OEAS Secretariat on the matter of the Oceanic Biome;
  5. I have even served as Ambassador at Large of Antarctica and Unrepresented or Underrepresented Polities since at least 27 December 2012, when my office was created by The Multipurpose Inter-Parliamentary Union (TMIPU);
This means that my place of citizenship by naturalisation (jus via naturalisation) can also be Antarctica, if I make and prove the claim is legitimate.

Well, I have made this claim public on this day of Tuesday, 1 January 2013 (or Jeuday 1 Archimedes 2013 in the Cesidian calendar), and I believe I have proven the legal validity of the claim to the best of my ability.

HMRD Cesidio Tallini